Author Topic: My first ever fishing kayak  (Read 1294 times)

Offline Kris_2020

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My first ever fishing kayak
« on: August 03, 2020, 09:19:21 pm »
I always wanted to buy a fishing kayak because there are so many small lakes and river not accessible by big boats so I finally pulled the trigger on one.
I didn't`t want to spend too much on it and just so happened I found this on kijiji which fits me perfect.


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Offline IFIDA

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Re: My first ever fishing kayak
« Reply #1 on: August 05, 2020, 02:48:23 pm »
BUMP  ??? ???

Online Mrbeee (Terry)

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Re: My first ever fishing kayak
« Reply #2 on: August 05, 2020, 02:52:02 pm »
Lake Simcoe the other Great Lake

Offline MantaRay14

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Re: My first ever fishing kayak
« Reply #3 on: August 22, 2020, 08:44:58 am »
Welcome to the club Kris, you'll find this is a great way to explore new waters. Since you are new, let me offer some tips if I may.

To begin with, great choice going with a SOT rather than sit in kayak for fishing, they are super stable. I know a lot of guys use sit ins, but if you are fishing rivers with a flow or big water (K-Bay, Lake Simcoe, etc.) a SOT is the way to go. As long as your plugs are in and your hatches sealed, you pretty much can't swamp them.

SAFETY FIRST
One thing you should do several times as soon as possible is take your kayak out, without any fishing gear, and practice water reentries.  In kayak fishing it's best to operate under the assumption that one day you will need this skill. It's not a matter of if, but when. If you find it difficult, then imagine what it will be like with a yak that is fully rigged up. This gets hairy if you have all your gear leashed down. Imagine all the rods, leashes and everything else floating or sinking under a rolled yak. Lots of things to get tangled in. You need to know what to expect before that emergency happens, especially in colder water.

Always wear your PFD. Too many deaths this year on the water. For years I was guilty of having my vest within reach while fishing, but never wore it unless actively paddling to a new spot. I always found even vests made for kayak fisherman to be too restrictive. Went with an inflatable 2 years ago and never looked back. Now I actually wear it the whole time I am on the water and it's barely noticeable.
Required safety kit. If you bought one of those Fox 40 safety kits (and many others too), the first thing you should do is chuck the flashlight it came with. Get a small, but good, waterproof flashlight.

It wouldn't be a bad idea to get some time on the water in an area that has a lot of boat traffic (obviously not in the boating lanes). Try taking the swells from the boat wakes at different angles on your hull while floating. I've seen more people get pitched because they were concentrating on fishing and took rollers to the side of the yak. Completely different feel than taking them head on.

Solo trips. Most of my kayak fishing is on my own due to my schedule. I would say that for a beginner kayak fisherman, this is not the way to go. You may not always be able to pair up with a buddy, but you should fish in an area with others in sight until you have a greater level of comfort and experience on the water. Get a waterproof bag and always keep your FULLY charged phone in the hatch nearest your seat. If you go solo, provide someone your fishing locations and how long you expect to be out. Again, we are losing too many yakkers and canoeists on our waters.

GEAR
Rod leashes (saw that you have a paddle leash) are really important unless you need an excuse for the wife to get new gear.  ;D
Rod floats. Get some rod floats and attach them to your rods, they can make a huge difference if you roll.
Landing net. Same thing, get a section of pool noodle for the handle to make it float.
Drift bag/sock. This is a good thing to have if fishing bigger waters. You may be surprised at what the wind will do to your yak, even with such a low profile. The drift bag will slow you down and keep you in the zone longer, if your doing something like fishing for lakers in K-Bay.
Electronics. This is a necessity in deeper water. You need to know where the fish are in the water column, otherwise you're just out getting exercise, which is great too. But even in shallower water (where you can sight fish) it's good to mark the waypoints for structure or hot spots.
Anchor trolley. These are a must have if you want to position yourself in a specific spot. It can be anchored from either side of the boat and adjusted for fishing angle.
An anchor. Lots of different styles, pick one that will suit the style of fishing you do most. What works on rocks may not work on a sandy bottom.
A safety flag. I installed extra rod holders on all my yaks and I leave one empty for my neon orange safety flag while on the water. We sit really low on the water and I've seen (K-bay for example) guys in boats who don't know or can't get their boat to plane. They cruise around with the bow in the air and would never be able to see you. Mine is on a 7' rod but there is only so much we can do on our part to have a safe, enjoyable trip. Things happen, even with all the bases seemingly covered.
A small emergency kit. Your basic little first aid kit should be augmented with a good pair of linesman pliers or dikes. You will find this essential if you ever really hook yourself with a lure or bait rig and need to cut through the hook shank in order to push the hook through the skin.

FUN
It's the name of the game and why we do it. Hope to see you on the water......
« Last Edit: August 22, 2020, 08:49:11 am by MantaRay14 »
Wishin' I was Fishin'

Offline MantaRay14

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Re: My first ever fishing kayak
« Reply #4 on: August 22, 2020, 09:05:28 am »
SOT kayaks are self bailing, so don't worry about water in the boat. As long as the scupper holes aren't plugged, the water will drain out. Just make sure you're wearing quick dry clothing.

Fishing tackle. I am notorious for bringing way too much tackle with me on most trips. I have now made tackle boxes for the species I am targeting, and this has decreased weight in the boat and also simplified my rigging choices. On Simcoe and other lakes with multi-species that may be targeted the same day, I do bring quite a bit, but that's mostly because I am a very active fisherman. I use multiple lure styles to search the water column bother near shore and out in the bay.

One last thing I forgot to mention. UV protection while on the water. I have dual citizenship and grew up in San Diego, California. Fishing has been my passion since I was 7 years old. In my age group, tanning was something we were trying for back then and that combined with several decades of fishing on the ocean left me with some serious skin damage. Last month I had three patches of skin cut out and biopsied. All precancerous thank God, but for a few years now I have been using UV rated long sleeve fishing shirts and gloves. I highly recommend use of  UV rated clothing. Cancer sucks.
Wishin' I was Fishin'

Offline Kris_2020

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Re: My first ever fishing kayak
« Reply #5 on: August 22, 2020, 12:25:33 pm »
Thanks for the tips. I appreciate it.

For the most part I feel like I am pretty well prepared. I only go on small lakes or rivers with the kayak with little to no boat traffic. That is why I really wanted a kayak to access those waters I can not with my boat.
I keep it fairly light and don't take a ton of gear out either. Right now just one rod and a few tackle but eventually I will bring 2 rods. I don't see myself ever bringing more then that.
I am working on the anchor trolley and I also am thinking of somehow to raise the seat so I can have more storage under the seat for a quick access. Not the most comfortable reaching in the back for tackles. That is the only time I feel like the kayak is a bit tipsy is when I reach in the back. Other then that I feel very safe in in and don't feel like I will ever tip over. Of course I never know if I hook into a monster pike or musky what that would do to the kayak lol

Oh and yeah the sun protection is a must. I don't burn easily at all and usually I can stand the sun for long periods on the boat but it is different on a kayak since I cannot really move around like I do on a boat so the sun is always hitting the same area. Usually my legs. I am definitely taking UV protection from now on or try to avoid the really hot days.

Again thanks for the advice guy

Offline Letterman1

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Re: My first ever fishing kayak
« Reply #6 on: August 23, 2020, 08:14:25 am »
Congrats with the new craft, I've been kayak fishing for a few years and I actually miss it when I'm in my bigger boat.  Kayaks are so much simpler but they do have drawbacks.  Obvioulsy storage, your going to have to minimize what you bring out with you.  Check out ram mounts, available at most big box out door stores or on Amazon.  They make a wide range of holders/accessories for all types of boating including kayaks.  My first suggestion is get rid of that tray in front of you, it's only going to get in your way and it doesn't look very stable anyway.  Your hatches look and sound secure so no issues there, put a small towel in the bottom to soak up any water that may get in when you open the lid.
If you paddling, you are going to get wet, those little rings on the end of the paddle may stop a bit of water but at the end of the day, it's a water sport and your also low to the water so just accept it.  If you fishing in cooler weather/end of season or early season wear a pair of water proof paddling pants.  These are a game changer on crappy cold days.  Enjoy you new boat, your'e one step away from a peddle craft now.

Offline Kris_2020

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Re: My first ever fishing kayak
« Reply #7 on: September 05, 2020, 10:29:46 am »
Congrats with the new craft, I've been kayak fishing for a few years and I actually miss it when I'm in my bigger boat.  Kayaks are so much simpler but they do have drawbacks.  Obvioulsy storage, your going to have to minimize what you bring out with you.  Check out ram mounts, available at most big box out door stores or on Amazon.  They make a wide range of holders/accessories for all types of boating including kayaks.  My first suggestion is get rid of that tray in front of you, it's only going to get in your way and it doesn't look very stable anyway.  Your hatches look and sound secure so no issues there, put a small towel in the bottom to soak up any water that may get in when you open the lid.
If you paddling, you are going to get wet, those little rings on the end of the paddle may stop a bit of water but at the end of the day, it's a water sport and your also low to the water so just accept it.  If you fishing in cooler weather/end of season or early season wear a pair of water proof paddling pants.  These are a game changer on crappy cold days.  Enjoy you new boat, your'e one step away from a peddle craft now.

Thanks. Yes the tray is kind of in the way so getting rid of that. Actually thinking of raising the seat a bit so I can put a pull out tray under the seat instead.
The paddle situation has been fixed. I bought better and longer paddles and they are great. I hardly get any water in the kayak now. I will definitely look into the water proof padding pants. Didn't`t even think such thing existed lol.
Any suggestion which ones and where to buy them?

Offline Righthook

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Re: My first ever fishing kayak
« Reply #8 on: November 06, 2020, 09:54:51 am »
 great buy and enjoy your self on your new toy